Out in Scripture

July 3, 2007

I just discovered this resource on HRC’s website: Out in Scripture.

The weeks seem to be a little bit off (it lists this week as July 15), but you can still find the current week if you do a little digging.  It can be found here.

An excerpt:

Boldly following Jesus, we hear Luke 9:51-62 call us to a different way of responding to those who disagree with us or do not preach the gospel in the way that we think they should. What would happen if the LGBT community and our allies were as motivated to “save” those who persecute us? Those who use the “Christian faith” to condemn others are most in need of “being saved” from the hell they create for themselves.

Boldly following Jesus also may mean finally, fully coming out about our faith and our sexual and relational lives. In Luke 9:57-62 we imagine hearing reasons for not being “out:” “What will my family think?” “After my father is dead, then I can come out.” These reasons echo the response of many to following Jesus: “Lord, first let me go and …” (Luke 9:60). How many closeted gay pastors and church leaders similarly insist they will come out once they retire!? So many reasons keep us and our allies from responding to God’s call to us, to walk in integrity, to be all that we have been created to be.

What is it that keeps us from following Christ’s radical call to personal and ecclesiastical integrity?

j

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2 Responses to “Out in Scripture”

  1. NancyP Says:

    Fear. Fear of being overwhelmed by people who won’t believe me, fear of doubting it myself, fear of suppressing myself to please others, fear of being the source of conflict, fear of not being “the best little girl in the world” (to crib the title of John Reed/Andrew Tobias’ book). The sort of fear which is bearable if one has a beloved, but overwhelming if one is depressed, shy, has low to nil libido, and has intimacy/trust issues.

  2. Jeff Says:

    Wow. That’s tough.

    It is really tough, I think. Coming out is always a personal decision, and affects each of us differently.

    For me, coming out is part of a lifelong process. Wrestling with fear and difference has become part of an eternal process of letting go and trusting – looking forward instead of looking backwards– and realizing the possibilities that are just around the corner but hidden from my own view, known only to my Creator.

    The Israelites knew fear. They had known only bondage in slavery. When Moses called them to something new, something different, they were resistant to change. They couldn’t see the possibilities for a life of freedom, a life of openness, a life without the shackles that had restrained them for so long. Even as they started and continued on their long journey towards the promised land they had many moments of fear, and turned back towards Egypt (back towards a life of slavery!) because they were scared of moving forward.

    But God gave them hope. They continued moving forward. They let go of their fear. They realized that the Creator who made a Covenant with them loved them enough to restore them, loved them enough to carry them around the bend in the road when fear buckled their knees, loved them enough to topple any foe set before them. It was a lesson learned through many trials, but the God of creation, restoration, and hope perservered.

    Whether the obstacles are social, emotional, physical, or something else, I believe that the time will come for all of us when we can see the possibilities that have previously been clouded and fuzzy, and the fear will be rolled back. I pray that day will come for you soon.

    j


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